Can wrong notes ever be good?

An area middle school director says,

“When in doubt, play it out.”

Someone sent me this pic and asked if I agreed. I’ll withhold comment until I hear yours. I already did post a comment on Facebook.

InterpretationWhat say YOU?

 

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in Teaching, Teaching Music

Parent Teacher Conferences

PT Conference Menu

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Communication, High Schools, Parenting, Teaching, Teaching Music

Simple, cheap (or free) to send an email marketing blast

email buttonNew way to send newsletters

I’ve previously used two methods to send email newsletters:

  • Popular email programs such as Yahoo Mail, GMail or Outlook. Pros: Free, of course, but these services have limitations to the number of letters you can send. if you have multiple targets, you can create groups and send specialized emails to each. Cons: Your email is text only. You can attach pics or a pdf looking letter, but some people don’t want to open attachments for security reasons.
  • Bulk Email Blast Services. You probably receive lots of letters through these types of services. Some will be identified at the bottom of the page. These services allow you to make great emails, but you pay either a monthly subscription or a “pay per email” fee.

A new (for me) WordPress Widget allows me to design an email newsletter to go to those who have subscribed to my blog, or who I have added — so it should be going to people who want to see what I’m doing. Note, however, that even they can ‘unsubscribe’, which is a necessary “opt-out” part of any courteous email campaign.

One of the things I like about this widget is that I can create multiple lists. For me, that might be those who are interested only in music things or those who have nothing to do with music but utilize me for web design, managed hosting, social media marketing, etc.

If you have an email list (prospects, customers, etc), consider using your blog to send an email newsletter.

Need help with that?

Don't try to figure out what all the words on this word wall mean. Let me go to work for you instead.

Don’t try to figure out what all the words on this word wall mean. Let me go to work for you instead.

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in Consulting, How May I Serve YOU?, Internet web design and ecommerce, Managed hosting, Sales and Marketing, Virtual Assistant

Now it is YOUR turn…

By John Gardner

It is normally about this time that Sophomores & Juniors, start to realize that their older friends they’ve look up to, learned from and leaned on, are graduating – and if they dwell on it, they can get down about next year. Don’t!

This is not a new or unique situation. It happens every year. So I would like to encourage you and others who have thought the same thing about graduated friends…. to consider a couple things.

First, if this note is speaking to you it is a compliment. As you think back during your Freshman and Sophomore years, there were Juniors and Seniors who accepted you into their friend circles, right? Those became strong and meaningful relationships and I suspect you gained from their experience and insight – and from their friends. And now, for those who are Juniors this year, the last of those friends will be graduating this semester and you feel alone. You look at those in your class or younger, who maybe don’t demonstrate the qualities you admired in your older friends. Immature, maybe? Fair enough.

Now, I’m going to ask you to try to get past the perfectly rational feeling that you’re losing some valuable friendships, and also past the probably correct conclusion that some of those in the classes younger than you are “less mature” than you….and consider that now it is YOUR turn to be the upperclass mentor who can do for others what was done for you.

Now it is YOUR turn to be the mature upperclassman for those younger. You know what it takes, better than they. You know what you want, better than they. So my question for you is, what are you going to do about it?

Perhaps you feel a little inadequate, like you’re not as ‘good’ as your mentors. You know what I think? I think you ARE. As you step into the leadership role, you know what I think? I think you CAN.

Disney quote Start Doing

If this note seems like I’m writing it specifically to you, then you probably have already been a “step it up” kinda person. That’s one of the reasons you’ve been comfortable around those older. Now it is YOUR turn to step into major leadership; to replace those who are leaving and to set the tone for those coming in and for those who are already looking up to you. NOW IT IS YOUR turn! YOU’RE READY. BE A LEADER. BE A MENTOR. BE A FRIEND….and we’ll all be the better for it, including YOU!

Thanks for reading,
John

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in High Schools, Respect, Teaching, Teaching Music

Should Music Booster Groups Accept Credit Cards?

Credit Card Processing Word WallBy John Gardner

For years, we’ve paid by credit card at department and grocery stores, at restaurants and gas stations. Now that we are handing our cards to the order-takers in fast food drive through lanes — is there anyone NOT accepting credit card payments? Oh yeah, MUSIC BOOSTER GROUPS! Should music booster groups accept credit cards? I say yes – and my three recommendations are below.

At QDP Corporation we tally and package fundraising orders for groups and other fundraising distributors and sell the software we use. Software sales have always been pre-paid, usually by credit card. We had a Merchant Account (ID number is longer than your credit card numbers) and software that enabled us to enter card information and get online confirmation. The money would be in our bank the next day. Because some of our software transactions could be as high as $3500, the processing percentage was a huge factor and aggressively negotiated.

For businesses that do high volume, online or big-ticket sales, a merchant account is necessary — AND…. is slightly less expensive than the mobile credit card apps I will discuss. BUT IT IS MORE COMPLEX. Every time I processed a card, I paid a “processing fee” (a percentage of the sale) PLUS a “transaction fee” (differed per credit card type) and a third fee (@$.02) that, quite frankly, I never quite figured out. I had to buy the software, sign extensive paperwork and read and sign periodically updated regulations.

BUT NOW…..

… there are 3rd party “Gateway” services that have simplified the process and enabled transactions to go online and mobile.

There have been payment gateways for online shopping carts for some time, but most of those involved monthly fees for both the shopping cart and the payment processing.

Now, however, there are many FREE credit card readers for mobile processing — with simplicity that makes it easier for booster groups.

Potential uses for a booster group accepting credit cards…..

  • Fair Share, Pay to Play, and Travel obligations. One of the biggest problems, especially with travelling competitive ensembles, is collecting participant fees. Few question their importance, but people are just not good at budgeting those kinds of payments. They WILL, however, make payments to their credit card companies. Once you process their card payment, YOU have YOUR money. 
  • Fundraisers. The booster officer is there when fundraising orders are coming in — or when product is being picket up — and taking payments on the spot.
  • Dinners / Donations / Advertisers
  • Concessions / Spirit Wear Sales
  • Ticket sales. Checking out blocks of tickets – or even accepting credit cards at the gate/door of the concert or competition.

Credit Card Processing Word Wall

 Merchant Account vs Payment Gateway

In a short article called, What’s the difference between a payment gateway and a merchant account, James Kelley describes the merchant account as a bank that works directly with you in processing your credit card transactions, or is another entity that works directly with your bank behind the scene.  In contrast, he describes a payment gateway as the

“technology used to capture credit card information from a buyer and securely transmit it to a merchant account. Payment gateway technology interfaces with your shopping cart software to seamlessly collect, encrypt, and transmit credit card information in real-time.”

Merchant Account

Acquiring a merchant account requires an extensive application and credit check process followed by dozen page contracts. Some merchant account providers have a monthly minimum (or minimum charge), a statement fee (which some will negotiate away) and software (no local traffic) or hardware (point-of-sale to swipe the credit card) to be purchased or leased.

Pros 

  • lower processing and transaction fees and percentages

Cons

  • extensive application process and credit check
  • monthly minimums or other fees
  • software or hardware for purchase or lease

Merchant Services Review lists their version of the Top 10 Merchant Services Providers in 2014 here.

Payment Gateway via Mobile Credit Card Processors

Of the services I am going to recommend, TopTenReviews.com ranks Intuit GoPayment #5 and Square #10.

Pros

  • Free reader and mobile phone / tablet software app
  • One fee (GoPayment varies from that a little)
  • No extensive application

Cons 

  • Higher processing fee (they are 3rd party that still has to pay a merchant account fee)

My 3 recommendations

As I looked at some of the options out there, some sounded much more suited for higher volume small business than I would consider most music booster groups — although a marching band of 100 needing to collect $200 per student for a “fair share” plus another $800 for an overnight trip could process $100,000. So maybe that’s not so small business.

Disclaimers: I have not used any of these readers. I have used both Quickbooks Accounting and Paypal Invoicing.

In no particular order:

square up readerSquareup.com

Fee: 2.75% flat rate. Fee page here. Keyed transactions 3.5% + $.15.

Pros

  • Free smartphone reader
  • Free cell phone app
  • Easy free account setup
  • Funds go to your bank account next day
  • Can sell and accept payments online
  • Sell online

Cons

  • Highest price
  • No live phone support – email and twitter help

=========================

PayPal ReaderPaypal Here

Fee: 2.7% flat rate. Keyed transactions 3.5% + $.15.

Paypal’s comparison chart: Paypal vs Intuit vs Square

Pros

 

  • Free Card reader
  • Free cell phone app
  • Live customer support
  • Funds available instantly in Paypal Account
  • Get additional 1% cashback to account
  • Can also Invoice and add “Buy It Now” and “Donate” buttons to most websites, including hosted wordpress sites.
  • Accept payments from invoices (customer can pay with paypal or use other credit cards) and checks

 

Cons

  • Transferring funds to bank account is an extra step and takes @3 days for funds to be available in the bank

=========================

Intuit card reader

Intuit GoPayment

Fees: 

  • Pay as you Go Plan. 2.4% + $.25. Keyed rate 3.4% + $.25.
  • Monthly Plan ($19.95/mo). 1.75% + $.25. Keyed rate 3.15% + $.25.

Pros

  • Free reader and mobile phone app
  • Auto deposit to bank account
  • Quickbooks Accounting accounts updated instantly
  • Invoice and accept invoice payments
  • Lower percentage fees
  • Live phone support

Cons

  • Requires Quickbooks Accounting (additional price)

=========================

Use my experience as a small business owner, a public school teacher, web designer and social media manager to help you increase your money collection capabilities and successes. Thanks for reading, John

VMO Business Card

Tagged with: , , , , , ,
Posted in Band as a Business, Consulting, High Schools, How May I Serve YOU?, Income Opportunity, Internet web design and ecommerce, Managed hosting, Pay to Play, Sales and Marketing, Virtual Assistant

I WANT To Trust You

Respect“Honesty is the best policy. If I lose mine honesty, I lose myself.” –William Shakespear

“Don’t compromise yourself. You’re all you’ve got.”–Janis Joplin

“Some things are black and white, right and wrong, good and bad. Honesty is one of those things. You have it or you don’t.

I can trust you – or I can’t.” -G

On TV, honesty seems to be relative; use it when you can, abandon it when it helps the moment. That is a sad reality that we must avoid in band. Trust requires honesty. Without trust, everything you do or say must be doubted, questioned or verified. Trust lost is hard to earn back.

In a conversation with band students, I asked for the most common answer from a teacher after a student request. “No.” I asked for the most common response from parents… “No.” Could it be that the tendency to say ‘No’ is at least partially driven by a low trust factor caused by a questionable honesty level? I say yes….in many cases.

So who goes first?

Dear students,

I WANT to trust you. I WANT to believe you. I WANT to say ‘Yes’. I WANT you to be truthful with me and I’M willing to take the first reasonable risk. The danger, for me then, is that some people are so accustomed to saying what is convenient at the moment (situational ethics?) that they do that with ME (automatically or intentionally – doesn’t matter) …..and I get burned, disappointed, even hurt. Why do I take it so personally? I wish I didn’t, but I do.

I almost lost my job once, as a young District Sales Manager for a national fundraising company, when I went to bat for some reps only to discover they had been feeding me lies. My boss’ response to my frustration and question about how to know who to trust was, “Trust is a treasure that some people haven’t earned, don’t value or can’t handle. You have to learn WHO you can give HOW MUCH to.”

Trust, but verify.” -Ronald Reagan

“You won’t get away with it.” -my pastor

My mama used to say…

“Burn me once, shame on YOU!
Burn me twice, shame on ME!”

A former student from my first teaching job posted on my facebook:

“I’m remembering a little white lie that Tina and I told you just to get out of class for a minute or two……..Unfortunately, you found out about it. I’ve never felt so guilty as when I was caught tricking YOU! You were the TEACHER to go to when things weren’t going ok. And a trusted teacher…….I was SO sorry!”

So this is not a new problem for me. It isn’t something that JUST happend. IT happens…. Sometimes you can get me …. yes you can. Some of you are very good at trying, because your moral compass is off….or broken. Sometimes, I DO give you the benefit of my doubt.  Burn me once….

Here’s the bottom line, the brutal truth, the real consequence… and it is important that YOU KNOW IN ADVANCE.

If I give you MY TRUST and you respond with YOUR LIES …. it changes EVERYTHING, including my ability to trust and respect YOU….probably for longer than it should. I can still be your teacher. I can still treat you with professionalism and dignity. But, burn me twice….

So what? Maybe nothing…..because then I become like all the other adults in your life who will almost always say no and who will be compelled to question and verify everything you say….and the games go on.

That makes me sad.

With respect and trust,
-G

VMO Business Card

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in Communication, High Schools, Teaching

Excellence and Self Esteem

excellentBy John Gardner

I have been conflicted for years on the proper educationally correct balance between helping students feel good about themselves….and encouraging achievement by encouraging and expecting excellence.

In a scholarly paper entitled, “Self-Esteem and Excellence: The Choice and the Paradox“, Barbara Lemer compares the strategies of creating intellectual stimulation with a climate of high self-esteem vs the argument that a child’s self-esteem can withstand criticism of shortcomings in the quest of excellence against a set of standards.

On his “School for Champions” site, Ron Kurtus writes to students about The Importance of Striving for Excellence.

At the Cornwel West Academy of Excellence, they use a curriculum that teaches “Self-Esteem Through Culture Leads to Academic Excellence (SETCLAE)”.

I came through a lot of “Old School” education, including techniques that could get a teacher in trouble today. But, for me….it worked. And so…the conflict.

My high school band director…

…recently retired after decades as the Director of Bands at a major university, did not care about our self-esteem. He never told us we were good and only commented that we were years after we were all gone from that place (see video and comment below). One of the few comments in a marching band rehearsal ever directed specifically at me was,

“Gardner, you march like a cow.”

So much for my personal self-esteem. I didn’t need to feel good about myself, I needed to improve my performance.

Toward the end of a competition once, as we were watching the bands that followed us, he pointed to one individual (fortunately not me) and said,

“If we lose this contest, it is YOUR fault.”

That one was harsh. I can’t imagine how that student would have felt. Fortunately we won.

He never told us we were an inner-city school, never said that we were under-privileged or under-funded. He never compromised when he demanded that every clarinet student acquire a top-line, pro-level Selmer Series 10 clarinet. No excuses. No exceptions. I sold lemonade on the local golf course and made a 50-50 deal with my dad to acquire mine.

At any moment, he would ask us to play a section of music in front of the band and, if less than perfect, he was brutal. Did we increase personal practice out of a search for excellence — or out of fear? Bottom line: we practiced and got better. Tell me the goal again.

Did it work? In terms of Achievement, yes. During my Freshman and Sophomore years, we never, ever lost a competition. We never got less than a “superior” rating in concert band festivals. When it came to All-State Band, our inner-city bandsters held the 1st chair positions for Flute, Clarinet, Alto Sax, Trumpet, French Horn, Baritone, Tuba and Percussion. Our concert band played at both a KMEA (KY) and MENC (National) music educator conventions.

We felt good about ourselves because we were good. Our self-esteem was the result of excellence, not encouragement. Is that wrong?

The most devastating comment soon to be Dr. Director ever made to me, a few years later when I met him at a collegiate conference, was….

“I was wrong.”

During the process of getting his doctorate (and during my college years of music education training), the prevailing theory became that creating good self-esteem was paramount, Self concept trumped both excellence and achievement. Was that the beginning of educational deterioration?

Here’s a YouTube video of the 1969 Holmes HS Band at the “Contest of Champions” in Murfreesboro, TN. Years later, this major mentor said,

“That was as close to perfection of any of my high school performances.”

Here’s a picture of his college band:

My high school clarinet teacher…

…was a high school band director at one of the communities outside the city. He taught private clarinet lessons and my band director wanted me to study with him….but there was no way we could afford his rate. My band director convinced him to give me an “audition” to be in his studio. My mother drove me to his house, I played the simple piece I had taken to 8th grade solo contest, and he responded with:

“You’ve got potential. I can make you a better, but we both have a problem. You can’t afford me while I, however, have a bad heart and cannot cut my grass, shovel my snow or rearrange my furniture.  If you ware willing to do those things for me, I will teach you until the day you show up here unprepared. Do we have a deal?”

He could have “given” me lessons by enabling me to “earn” them, he enhanced my self-esteem while enhancing my chances for achieving excellence. Would a “deal” like that be considered abusive today?  Actually, I’ve tried. No takers. Sad.

Roden was teaching the 1st chair clarinetists from three area schools. When it came time for senior year Solo Contest, he gave all three of us the same piece of music. His focus was not on helping each of us feel good…but rather, to play that piece of music better than the other two. You can read more about that story, along with the outcome, in “Four Influential Men“.

My college clarinet professor

As decision-time for college approached, I had two full ride offers from schools where I had participated in clinics and summer camps; Eastern Kentucky University and Morehead State University. My clarinet teacher recommended a different school/teacher and I took his advice.

Dr. Miller drove 70 miles to my high school to audition me. I performed that flashy contest piece from solo contest that resulted in a standing ovation from the judge and a I++ rating. When I finished, I pompously waited for the praise. Instead, I witnessed a man in pain, pulling on his short beard, trying to think of words that would inspire me to choose his school, right? After a pause that seemed like an eternity, he finally offered this dated comment…

“Not bad. Flashy, but NASA can teach monkeys how to wiggle their fingers. What else can you do.?”

Those hour-long 1-1 lessons each week were about survival. I recall sitting outside his office waiting for the person before me to finish. When the door opened, an excellent clarinetist came out of the room crying, took the reed off her horn and smashed it up against the wall as I heard him call out from inside the room, “NEXT”!

He did teach me how to play better. I accomplished a lot during college. But during my final semester, when he finally realized that I really was going to do the “education” thing and spend time student teaching, one of his parting comments to me;

“I wasted four years of my life on you.”

But now that I am a teacher…

…I find that I am not willing to talk to students that way. Actually, I probably would be fired for doing so.

Today it would be educationally incorrect (and probably unacceptable) to require a student to stand with arms outstretched parallel to the ground for ten minutes, or to do laps around the field (1 per each minute tardy) or push ups for making a mistake. Today we must make exceptions and allowances for the nearly 30% of the student population with IEP’s. To ask a student to play a part in front of everyone in the ensemble….oh my. It is okay that your instrument is a piece of junk, or that your parents won’t “give” you the money for individualized coaching. After all, I can’t say anything to forceful or you’ll drop the class or quit the lessons. What if you’re on medication? What if I missed a condition in the book of IEP’s? What if your parents call the school?

Not too long ago, I read an article (sorry, having trouble finding it again) that seemed to support my pre-IEP, pre-Self-Esteem-is-everything approach to education.

“…students should experience Self-Esteem as a result of Excellence Achievement.”

I would modify that slightly. ACHIEVING excellence may not represent reality for everyone, but everyone can STRIVE for excellence.

What do YOU think?

VMO Business Card

Posted in College Prep, High Schools, Parenting, Teaching, Teaching Music

Taking Lies Personally

I wish I could stop taking lies so personally. I mean…..after all, it is the way society is these days, right? Here’s the message I can’t quite send to the student……

“You didn’t have to tell me where you were going for Spring Break. I was just trying to make conversation. You certainly could have told me it wasn’t any of my business — and I would have preferred that…..to the outrageous story you told me. Maybe I should be flattered that you might not want me to think negatively of you. Well, guess what. And now I can’t trust you — and that makes me sad. By the way, I would have wished you a great trip anyway.” 

What follows is a draft of a post (already written prior to this) called, “I WANT To Trust You”

Respect“Honesty is the best policy. If I lose mine honesty, I lose myself.” –William Shakespear

“Don’t compromise yourself. You’re all you’ve got.”–Janis Joplin

“Some things are black and white, right and wrong, good and bad. Honesty is one of those things. You have it or you don’t.

I can trust you – or I can’t.” -G

On TV, honesty seems to be relative; use it when you can, abandon it when it helps the moment. That is a sad reality that we must avoid in band. Trust requires honesty. Without trust, everything you do or say must be doubted, questioned or verified. Trust lost is hard to earn back.

In a conversation with band students, I asked them for the most common answer from a teacher after a student request. “No.” I asked for the most common response from parents… “No.” Could it be that the tendency to say ‘No’ is at least partially driven by a low trust factor caused by a questionable honesty level? I say yes….in many cases.

So who goes first?

I WANT to trust you. I WANT to believe you. I WANT to say ‘Yes’. I WANT you to be truthful with me and I’M willing to take the first reasonable risk. The danger, for me then, is that some people are so accustomed to saying what is convenient at the moment (situational ethics?) that they do that with ME (automatically or intentionally – doesn’t matter) …..and I get burned, disappointed, even hurt. Why do I take it so personally? I wish I didn’t, but I do.

I almost lost my job once, as a young District Sales Manager for a national fundraising company, when I went to bat for some reps only to discover they had been feeding me lies. My boss’ response to my frustration and question about how to know who to trust was, “Trust is a treasure that some people haven’t earned, don’t value or can’t handle. You have to learn WHO you can give HOW MUCH to.”

Trust, but verify.” -Ronald Reagan

“You won’t get away with it.” -my pastor

My mama used to say…

“Burn me once, shame on YOU!
Burn me twice, shame on ME!”

A former student from my first teaching job posted on my facebook:

“I’m remembering a little white lie that Tina and I told you just to get out of class for a minute or two……..Unfortunately, you found out about it. I’ve never felt so guilty as when I was caught tricking YOU! You were the TEACHER to go to when things weren’t going ok. And a trusted teacher…….I was SO sorry!”

So this is not a new problem for me. It isn’t something that JUST happend. IT happens…. Sometimes you can get me …. yes you can. Some of you are very good at trying, because your moral compass is off….or broken. Sometimes, I DO give you the benefit of my doubt.  Burn me once….

Here’s the bottom line, the brutal truth, the real consequence… and it is important that YOU KNOW IN ADVANCE.

If I give you MY TRUST and you respond with YOUR LIES …. it changes EVERYTHING, including my ability to trust and respect YOU….probably for longer than it should. I can still be your teacher. I can still treat you with professionalism and dignity. But, burn me twice….

So what? Maybe nothing…..because then I become like all the other adults in your life who will almost always say no and who will be compelled to question and verify everything you say….and the games go on.

That makes me sad.

 

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in Parenting, Respect, Teaching

Email To Client about Content Marketing

By John Gardner

I get mind boggled by all the super-geek-speak about SEO (Search Engine Optimization) and how to get what you say, who you are or what you do listed higher on search engine results. It is kinda like my conversation after taking my car to a brake shop because “it doesn’t feel right” and I hear (includes exaggeration for effect – but also several terms I heard):

“You’re almost metal to metal so I want to replace the pads for you. You don’t want the cheap ones, do you? I could turn the rotors, but they are already thin. Plus the calipers were hot after the test drive and the hoses were blue. There were some spots on the rear drums. Shall I replace all that at once or do you want to go buy a new car?”

I have a new client who is admittedly neither a proficient writer nor a sales guru. I just read a spot-on article called, “Content Marketing Sales For Non Sales People“, which makes the case for using “content” rather than optimization-gimmicks to drive people to your site —  and was starting an email to my client recommending they read that article — and prioritize their “To-Do” list about building their brand with blog posts (or let me do it for them) ….when I decided to create THIS POST for others similarly situated.

Word Cloud Content MarketingI created this Word Cloud to give you ideas of possible blog articles. Each of those could be a question answered by a single article.

  • Send me notes, outline or rough draft – I can write the article and have you approve prior to publication.
  • Tell me if what you send is what you want posted (without edit) or if you want me to edit and enhance.
  • Include a picture (consider copyright). I can offer legally correct pictures if I know what you have in mind — or provide guidelines to do that for you.
  • Suggest links to pages on your website or to other sites that support what you are saying.
  • Don’t make it an exhaustive research project. You can follow-up later. Procrastination kills potential posts.

Be the expert. Let me manage your content.

GO!

VMO Business Card

 

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in Communication, Consulting, Internet web design and ecommerce, Managed hosting, Sales and Marketing, Small Business, Social Media, Virtual Assistant

Private lessons can be like paying for college…1 week at a time

By John Gardner

Private LessonsA few years ago I was sitting in the driveway of my son’s trumpet teacher writing out a check.

The teacher had requested going from a half hour lesson to an hour. I recall the teacher’s response when I asked if there was a discount for the double-session…..

You get me for twice the time at twice the price.

As I wrote out the check, I shared a sentiment with my son,

I consider this an investment in your college career. I hope I am paying for your college one week at a time….and by the time you’re ready to graduate that you will be good enough that a college will pay for you.

He worked — and his did.

Private lessons (coaching / mentoring) provides much more than that…

…even for students who will NOT be majoring in music in college. Read more ›

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in College Prep, High Schools, Solo Prep, Teaching, Teaching Music

Categories