Now it is YOUR turn…

By John Gardner

It is normally about this time that Sophomores & Juniors, start to realize that their older friends they’ve look up to, learned from and leaned on, are graduating, have graduated or are gone – and if they dwell on it, they can get down about the next (new) year. Don’t!

This is not a new or unique situation. It happens every year. So I would like to encourage you and others who have thought the same thing about graduated friends…. to consider a couple things.

First, if this note is speaking to you it is a compliment. As you think back during your Freshman and Sophomore years, there were Juniors and Seniors who accepted you into their friend circles, right? Those became strong and meaningful relationships and I suspect you gained from their experience and insight – and from their friends. And now, for those who are Juniors this year, the last of those friends will be graduating this semester and you feel alone. You look at those in your class or younger, who maybe don’t demonstrate the qualities you admired in your older friends. Immature, maybe? Fair enough.

Now, I’m going to ask you to try to get past the perfectly rational feeling that you’re losing some valuable friendships, and also past the probably correct conclusion that some of those in the classes younger than you are “less mature” than you….and consider that now it is YOUR turn to be the upperclass mentor who can do for others what was done for you.

leadership2

Now it is YOUR turn to be the mature upperclassman for those younger. You know what it takes, better than they. You know what you want, better than they. So my question for you is, what are you going to do about it?

Perhaps you feel a little inadequate, like you’re not as ‘good’ as your mentors. You know what I think? I think you ARE. As you step into the leadership role, you know what I think? I think you CAN.

Disney quote Start Doing

If this note seems like I’m writing it specifically to you, then you probably have already been a “step it up” kinda person. That’s one of the reasons you’ve been comfortable around those older. Now it is YOUR turn to step into major leadership; to replace those who are leaving and to set the tone for those coming in and for those who are already looking up to you. NOW IT IS YOUR turn! YOU’RE READY. BE A LEADER. BE A MENTOR. BE A FRIEND….and we’ll all be the better for it, including YOU!

Thanks for reading,
John

Leadership is service not position

Posted in High Schools, Respect, Teaching, Teaching Music Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,

A new Virtual Services Possibilities Prezi

Posted in Business strategies, Consulting, How May I Serve YOU?, Internet web design and ecommerce, Managed hosting, Sales and Marketing, Small Business, Social Media, Virtual Assistant, Virtual/Local Services

How I use Google Voice for my Small Business

By John Gardner

Phone Word CollageWhen I started my VirtualMusicOffice, I wanted a phone number other than my home or cell phone. I didn’t want to add a monthly phone bill. I wanted to screen calls and take calls on either my home phone or cell phone, and to know before I picked up that it was a business call. If I missed a call, I wanted a professional voice mail message for my caller and a way to have immediate access to the message from a variety of methods that would not require listening to it on my phone. Because I conduct my business virtually anywhere, but including locally, I wanted a local phone number. From several options, including subscription and free, I selected Google Voice.

In the signup process, I was able to search for phone number options by area code and zip code. I wanted a local phone number and was able to get a prefix from a small town 5 miles away from Huntington. Some of the calls I get are because people recognize the prefix.

I set my account so that a call would ring simultaneously to both my home AND cell phone. Prior to answering the call, I can see that the Caller ID indicates it is a Virtual Music Office (VMO) call. Google Voice prompts the caller (option) to say his/her name, so the first thing I hear when I answer is,

“You have a call from…..”

…and then I can choose to take the call or not.

Voice Mail and messages. The caller hears the message I recorded for the VMO call — NOT the messages on my cell or phone phones. That’s a good thing.

Message notifications. I have my account for multiple notifications:

  1. text to my phone that I have a message with a transcript. So I can SEE the message without having to listen to it. That is handy if I am in a meeting or somewhere phone use would be a distraction.
  2. email to my Gmail address. From that email I can read and/or listen to the message. (Sometimes, especially if the caller fails to speak clearly, the transcription might contain nonsense word(s).
  3. Google Voice account. From the list of messages I can edit the transcription to fix any nonsense words. From this list I can….
    • Call. The system calls your phone and then connects you to the caller, so they don’t see your home/cell number.
    • Text. Again, the text comes from your Voice (not your private) number.
    • Email.
    • Block caller.
    • …and more

=============

I’d like to be your Virtual Assistant. Check me out at VirtualMusicOffice.com/about

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Posted in Consulting, How May I Serve YOU?, Internet web design and ecommerce, Managed hosting, Virtual Assistant, Virtual/Local Services Tagged with: , , ,

Corporate Common Core Standards for Business

By John Gardner

Common Core Corporate RottenSince one purpose of education is to prepare world learners for success in the business/corporate world, we should implement  Corporate Common Core (CCC) Standards for Business.

Businesses cannot continue to compete in such a way as to assign and support inappropriate labels like “winners” and “losers” or “profit” and “loss”. We don’t condone competition in our Common Core classrooms, so why should it be acceptable in business?

Corporations should mainstream employees into adequately average work groups, de-emphasizing, promoting or rewarding achievers or gifted performers. Stop encouraging the win. Stakeholders should applaud improvement, not excellence (because not everyone will make it to that level) or bottom line.

All businesses should start no-employee-left-behind corporate common core standards.

Most businesses are guilty of talent discrimination, especially in hiring. Just as the system encourages teachers to modify tests to increase success and ensure evenly distributed test scores across economic and ethnic boundaries, businesses should hire from the mainstream (average) pool of applicants, or just hire all who want a job.

The corporate world should follow the lead of public education as it moves away from GT (Gifted & Talented) programs and recognizing Valedictorians — and focus on showing improvement for the poorest performers. Yes, all should improve, but the process includes no longer rewarding high achievement. Educators should not label students, i.e. advanced/gifted or remedial/slow.

Every employee, regardless of ability, must participate in every task, like they did in t-ball where the emphasis was on playing rather than winning.

Increase the number of steps for any task and force all to take every step. Follow the example of this Common Core 4th grade math problem that takes 108 steps to complete.

The first year using Corporate Common Core Standards, there will be no improvement expectations, but rather for all to focus on a particular skill, like getting to work on time. Each year they will add one skill – such as all working the full number of minutes paid for without taking extra breaks. In year two, employees will stay on task 80% of the time, representing the accepted standard for employees in the high and medium competency groups. Workers in the “low” performing group can strive for 60% instead of 80. For each sub-standard worker, the manager will write an individual plan. No one can move on until they ALL do.

Remember, Common Core is about helping EVERYBODY get better. The focus cannot be on those with above average proficiencies.

You cannot single people out for higher level work. If there is a specialty task, all employees will strive to achieve it.

It is about process, not product.

One of the problems facing businesses as they adjust to the CCC is that they tend to reward achievers, increasing their pay and giving them ‘special’ titles. Similarly to the way academics is removing labels like “special, gifted or valedictorian”, businesses must stop assigning titles like, supervisorteam leader, as those imply higher rank. To meet the CCC, every employee will perform each of those duties every day.

Focus on helping every person reach the core (minimum) competency. Make them each feel good and accomplished every day, because they did the best they could and their best is good enough if it is better than the last effort. Get over those out-dated ideas that some people or groups are better than others. In business, as in public schools, we need competency, not excellence. Compare individual performance to the common average. Compare the company average to that of their competitors. Just imagine what will happen when every business meets the same level success.

No more superior brands. All business will move toward the mediocre core competency. Share ingredients and packaging with all competitors, so everybody can meet the common standard. Regulate production so no business can individually excel. Remove phrases like “the best” or “superior quality” from all marketing.

Some businesses have taken advantage of exceptional innovators, engineers, marketers and salespeople. That practice cannot continue. The state will decide the designs, ingredients, pricing and sales practice. Think of the money that will save. Surely each business will pay less for the state-mandated practices than it would for customized work by competing specialists. Only when all businesses are the same size, with the same expectations and performing at the same level — will we really be able to achieve that universal core competency.

No more unequal funding. Efficient operations that have worked harder to conduct profitable business will spread the wealth so that all competitors become equal.

“From each according to his ability, to each according to his need.”

Industry averages become the standards. Each worker will display working fundamentals at a moderate level, demonstrating an average understanding of business practices (production, marketing, sales). Average is the new normal, the new standard. No more focus on “winning” or “competing to beat” the competition. Those who begin to show higher levels of performance will have extra break time mandated to allow slower, less efficient operations to catch up.

After the first year expectations of 80% accuracy in rubric items like attendance and basic practices, raise the goal for the second year to 85%, unless there are still those unable to meet the 80% benchmark . Managers will write individual performance plans, outlining steps to help the sub-standard worker and will be held accountable for those failing to meet minimums core competencies, but since it would not be fair to expect managers to do that on his/her own time, that planning will happen only while working “on the clock”.

Assessing core competencies. Instead of using bottom line growth or profit to determine success, the government will provide a 4-6 page form that the CEO or business owner will use to evaluate the company, and another form for the manager to assess each employee.

Managers must take part in professional development training to learn the necessary and unnecessary forms and formulas. While in PD training, workers must stop working because the Corporate Common Core assumes that unsupervised employees cannot function.

Managers will design a pre-season test to determine what employees know, but must get both the pre-test and the final assessment pre-approved. The approval process can involve multiple adjustments as determined by the professional development person within the building. Note: If that person doesn’t yet exist, Corporate Common Core mandates hiring from outside to train, administer and monitor the process.

Using a complex formula requiring training to understand, test data will classify (label) each employee as “highly effective”, “effective”, “needs improvement” or “not effective”. Use test data, not work product to rate managers, whose job is on the line if the test data fails to show individual improvement. Monitors will focus on the overall team averages. Reassign highly productive employees to tutor/mentor/train those operating at a lower level. One aspect of the Corporate Common Core is that “No Employee Left Behind” is given priority over the overall bottom line. Instead of dismissing poor performers, give them tasks that show they are improving. Improvement, not results, is key.

The good news is that with enough enthusiastic manager and CEO/Owner commitment to spending major work hours evaluating data and devising, discussing and implementing  individual employee plans (IEP’s), there is reason for optimism that the end result will be average.

————-

If your Corporate Common Core goal is to achieve and celebrate mediocrity (Corporate Standards) — don’t call me. Otherwise, if I can assist individuals (on site or remotely via Skype) your focused performers who want to improve their individual proficiencies past the minimum average, I would love to hear from you.

Thanks for reading.

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Posted in Business strategies, Consulting, Sales and Marketing, Small Business Tagged with: , , ,

Common Core Standards for Marching Band

By John Gardner

Common CoreMarching Bands in public schools cannot continue to compete in such a way as to assign and support educationally incorrect labels like “winners” and “losers”. We don’t tolerate that in our classrooms, so why should it be acceptable in marching band or any type of competitive music (jazz festivals, concert band contests, show choirs, solo & ensemble, etc)? Bands should follow the academic practice – mainstreaming players into average ensembles, thereby reducing the emphasis and focus on special or gifted performers. Stop emphasizing the win. Crowds should cheer improvement, not excellence (because not everyone will make it to that level) or the final score. Instead of waiting for a government mandate, all public school marching band programs should implement no-bandster-left-behind common core standards.

Most bands do meet a core competency about total involvement and engagement, but must ensure EVERY band member participates in every performance, like they did in t-ball where the emphasis was on playing rather than winning. Nobody deserves the labels alternate or substitute.

The first year, there will be no scoring expectations, but all will develop a particular skill, like standing up straight, stepping off with the correct foot, moving to the beat, marching in step, memorizing music and a drill routine, and playing while marching… Each year they will add a skill – all performers will march in step 80% of the time, play 80% of the notes correctly, toss a rifle and spin a flag without dropping more than 5 times. If they fail to meet the mediocre standard, the band director will write a plan for each sub-standard member and work each individual plan. No one can move on until they ALL do.

Remember, Common Core is about helping EVERYBODY get better. The focus cannot be on those with above average proficiencies.

You cannot single people out by assigning a solo unless every person on the field will solo in every performance. It is not about featuring the better performers, it is about giving everyone equal opportunity. Drill writers and music arrangers must consider this as they do their work, although the state solution described below addresses this.

One of the problems facing marching bands as they adjust to the common core is that they tend to have a very small number of student conductors on the field. The Drum Major audition process violates common-core principles and should be eliminated. Similarly to the way academics is removing labels like “special” and “gifted”, marching bands (and directors) will stop assigning titles like, drum majorsoloistsection leader, or captain, as those imply higher rank. To meet the common core, every participant will perform in each of those positions in every performance.

Focus on helping every person reach the core competency. Make them each feel good and accomplished after every performance, because they did the best they could and their best is good enough if it is better than the last effort. Get over those out-dated ideas that some people or groups are better than others. Let the real world of employers deal with that. In public school, we need average. Compare individual scoring to the common average. Compare the school average to the state averages. Compare state averages. Just imagine what will happen when every band in every school in the country is average.

No more marching band classifications based on band or school size. Larger bands will transfer students to smaller bands until every band has 100 performers. Instrumentation, including winds, percussion, front ensembles and even auxiliary – should be the same, as defined by the state.

All ensembles will move toward the mediocre core competency. Stronger and weaker bands will exchange members until they are comparable. Band directors who continue to use terminology like “winning”, “being the best” or “superior” will be fired and replaced by teachers with an “average” record.

Some bands have taken advantage of exceptional drill writers, music composers/arrangers and choreographers. That practice cannot continue. The state will determine the music and provide the routine. Think of the money that will save. Surely each band will pay less for the state-mandated music and drill than it would for customized work by competing specialists. Only when all bands are the same size, with the same instrumentation, performing the same music to the same drill — will we really be able to achieve that universal core competency.

No more unequal funding. Efficient band parent operations who have worked harder to conduct profitable fundraisers will spread the wealth so that all bands have the same opportunities to get better instruments, uniforms, music or instruction.

“From each according to his ability, to each according to his need.”

Averages on judging rubrics become standards. Each performer will display marching fundamentals at a moderate level, demonstrating an average understanding of body carriage and movement. Average horn carriage is the new normal, the new standard. No more focus on “horn pop” or “in-your-face” performing. Those who begin to show higher levels of performance will get extra break time or assigned to help those who have not yet met the standard. After the first year expectations of 80% accuracy in rubric items like marching in step and playing right notes, the goal for the second year will be raised to 85%, unless there are still those unable to meet the 80% benchmark . Directors will write individual rehearsal and performance plans, outlining what steps are implemented to help the sub-standard performer and will be held accountable for those failing to meet minimums core competencies, but since it would not be fair to expect directors to do that on his/her own time, that planning will happen during the rehearsals.

Judges will consider school and team core competency levels as part of their visual, music and general effect performance assessments. Judges will evaluate data before the competition exhibition and review the scoring at every break and adjust as necessary to ensure all groups receive comparable scores.

Assessing core competencies. Instead of using placement or achievement records or scores at events to determine success, the government will provide a 4-6 page form that principals will use to evaluate the school, and another form for the band director to assess each student. Directors must take part in professional development training to learn the forms and formulas because they weren’t taught how to do that in music school.

Directors will design a pre-season test to determine what students know, but must get both the pre-test and the final exam pre-approved. The approval process can involve multiple adjustments as determined by the professional music development person within the building. Note: that person doesn’t yet exist but implementation of core standards will make it necessary to hire more non-teachers to train, administer and monitor the process.

Using a complex formula requiring training to understand, test data will classify (label) as “highly effective”, “effective”, “needs improvement” or “not effective”. The amount of improvement, provided by the test results data, in addition to the scores at competitions are one of the factors in the band director effectiveness determination. Judges will be focusing on the overall team averages.

The good news is that with enough enthusiastic director and administrator commitment to spending major parts of practice times evaluating data and devising, discussing and implementing  individual music plans (IMP’s), there is reason for optimism that the end result will be average.

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If you need help reaching your average core competencies, please search out the appropriate professionals — don’t call me. Otherwise, if I can assist individuals (on site or remotely via Skype) your focused performers who want to improve their individual proficiencies past the minimum average, I would love to hear from you.

Thanks for reading.

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Posted in Teaching Music Tagged with: , , , , ,

Does Assembly Line Education Model Ford’s ‘T’ Line?

By John Gardner

See my post, called “17 indications you are teaching in a factory school”.

In his book, Assembly Line Selling, David F. McCullough, president of Transamerica Microsearch, Inc., bases his contact-management driven sales approach on Henry Ford’s assembly line, where he said that….

The Model T was

  1. a simple product
  2. perfectly targeted to buyers’ needs
  3. constructed with interchangeable parts
  4. which arrived with flawless timing
  5. to be assembled on a continuously moving line
  6. powered by motorized conveyor belts
  7. staffed by a division of labor
  8. that worked on various stages of manufacture
  9. to meet a compelling demand

Is factory education as efficient as the Model T Assembly Line?

Factory Education is:

  1. a simple product  a complex process
  2. perfectly targeted to buyers’ needs  generally targeted toward state-sponsored universities or lower demand business  
  3. constructed with interchangeable parts / students
  4. which arrived with flawless timingschool busses
  5. to be assembled on a continuously moving line class schedule, which won’t stop for any reason
  6. powered by motorized conveyor belts / computerized schedules and class change bells
  7. staffed by a division of labor teachers
  8. that worked on various stages of manufacture production;  English, Math, Science, Arts, etc
  9. to meet a compelling demand / modest expectation, defined as slightly above the state average

The result of the assembly line was that it

  • mass-produced cars - faster than by previous manufacturing methods
  • at a lower cost per unitok, education needs to put in some work there….
  • with higher and more consistent qualityditto above
Indiana High School

Indiana High School

General Motors Assembly in Fort Wayne, Indiana

General Motors Assembly in Fort Wayne, Indiana

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Posted in College Prep, Factory Education, High Schools, Public Schools, Teaching, Types of education Tagged with: , , , , ,

3 Types of Thriving Teens

By John Gardner

On three

1. Good Teens thrive BECAUSE of their parents

For one group, I give much credit to good parenting. These are the parents who are active and involved in their teen’s life. They’re on the PTO, in the band/choir/athletic booster groups, they come to watch practices, performances or games, they volunteer to help and they put up the money that most worth while ventures require. Some, are more behind the scenes supporting, enabling  and encouraging. Outside of school activities, the family is together a lot. Maybe there isn’t a lot of money for fancy vacations, but they find ways to do things together anyway. Single parents and those who have remarried can also do fantastic jobs. My heart goes out to those super parents who are experiencing what author James Dobson calls “the strong-willed child”.

Keep the faith and keep doing what you’re doing. The teen will figure it out eventually.

2. Good Teens thrive IN SPITE of their parents

A second group, and one that I especially admire, are those teens who turn out great “in spite of”  their parents. These are the teens who have every reason (mostly by example) to crash and burn, and yet, they determine NOT to follow the paths of their parents and instead, commit themselves to a better life.

I’m not faulting single, lower-income, laid off or otherwise challenged parents doing the best they can. My parents divorced when I (oldest of 5) was in 7th grade. My mother was a polio-survivor without a car. We didn’t have it easy but we had love and support — and we all survived.

I DO fault those who could, but don’t share or support the child’s enthusiasm for a worthy activity.

Your child knows, is hurt, embarrassed and deflated by your lack of support.

A high school clarinet student once tell me,

“My dad has never heard me play.”

You will only have that child in your care for a short time.

I was outside our band entrance door greeting students arriving for rehearsal. The car stopped and both student and parent got out. The girl ran to me, in tears, frantically exclaiming, “I’m sorry, I’m sorry!” before running into the building. Behind her came the papa with the band schedule in hand. There was no warm, fuzzy response to my “Hi, how ya doin’?” Instead, he almost slapped me in the face with the schedule as he grunted, “How much of this schedule is mandatory?” After my response, “All of it.”, he mumbled something I wouldn’t print even if I heard it clearly. The daughter was waiting for me in the office, still crying, and apologizing for what she was sure I had endured. My respect and admiration for her attitude and work ethic skyrocketed after that.

A sophomore asked me for some personal clarinet coaching. Things were going great until she came in one day tearfully explaining she had to quit. She had gotten a job to pay for her lessons, because her parents would not, and when they learned how she was spending her earnings, they started charging her rent.

I continued her lessons anyway.

Another student came in from the parking lot to ask for some help with a flat tire. He called his mother while the other director and I taught him how to change a tire. To get to the spare, he had to unhook the huge woofer in the trunk. The mother and boyfriend arrived and, instead of thanking us for staying or trying to help, boyfriend starts screaming at the teen, “How dare you let somebody else touch my car. This isn’t over, kid.”

These are the students we find walking home after the concert, football game, or competition — because they know their parents will not come pick them up. Some get their own jobs to raise their own money to pay the participation fees, even earning money to go on the Disney trip.

3. Good Teens thrive because of who they are

Some teens naturally have what it takes for greatness. Natural greatness combined with good parenting is definitely a winning combination.

Thanks for reading.

John

Posted in College Prep, High Schools, Public Schools, Respect, Teaching Tagged with: , , ,

Email To Client about Content Marketing

By John Gardner

Customer Service - Lifting the WordsI get mind boggled by all the super-geek-speak about SEO (Search Engine Optimization) and how to get what you say, who you are or what you do listed higher on search engine results. It is kinda like my conversation after taking my car to a brake shop because “it doesn’t feel right” and I hear (includes exaggeration for effect – but also several terms I heard):

“You’re almost metal to metal so I want to replace the pads for you. You don’t want the cheap ones, do you? I could turn the rotors, but they are already thin. Plus the calipers were hot after the test drive and the hoses were blue. There were some spots on the rear drums. Shall I replace all that at once or do you want to go buy a new car?”

I have a client who is admittedly neither a proficient writer nor a sales guru. I just read a spot-on article called, “Content Marketing Sales For Non Sales People“, which makes the case for using “content” rather than optimization-gimmicks to drive people to your site —  and was starting an email to my client recommending they read that article — and prioritize their “To-Do” list about building their brand with blog posts (or let me do it for them) ….when I decided to create THIS POST for others similarly situated.

Word Cloud Content MarketingI created this Word Cloud to give you ideas of possible blog articles. Each of those could be a question answered by a single article.

  • Send me notes, outline or rough draft – I can write the article and have you approve prior to publication.
  • Tell me if what you send is what you want posted (without edit) or if you want me to edit and enhance.
  • Include a picture (consider copyright). I can offer legally correct pictures if I know what you have in mind — or provide guidelines to do that for you.
  • Suggest links to pages on your website or to other sites that support what you are saying.
  • Don’t make it an exhaustive research project. You can follow-up later. Procrastination kills potential posts.

Be the expert. Let me manage your content.

GO!

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Posted in Communication, Consulting, Internet web design and ecommerce, Managed hosting, Sales and Marketing, Small Business, Social Media, Virtual Assistant Tagged with: , , , ,

Web-volution: Web Design is evolving

By John Gardner

s & h green stampsWeb-volution: Web Design is evolving.

When I first became involved in web design a decade ago, designing a site required a lot of expertise, expensive design and photo editing software plus an expensive scanner that could only be justified if used as a service provider. The designer had to write code in HTML and PHP and upload via FTP. For most, web design and hosting required expensive experts. It was an almost overwhelming environment, purported by the industry itself, that discouraged self-design. Even some programmers didn’t want to tackle web design.

Getting a web page cost hundreds (or thousands) in start-up design followed by hourly upkeep or ongoing retainers and maintenance for edits and updates. Those were the days of $40-$80-$125/hr fees. Avoiding those fees attributed much to the outdated and abandoned sites left for prospects to stumble through. High-priced designers are still out there, but they no longer control the market. YOU DO!

Web designers have been historically successful in preaching “custom” vs “cookie-cutter” to prevent your looking like everybody else. Sites had to “flash”, show spinning buttons and cool screen changes. But in the same way doctor-prescribed Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen and Naproxin Sodium became over-the-counter Tylenol, Advil and Aleve, which now compete with over the counter (OTC) generics, we no longer have to live with more expensive prescription-level websites.

If you don’t want to design and maintain your own site, at least go for the OTC rates because it is no longer the ultra-fancy specialized static design you need….it is dynamic and content driven functionality.

STATIC vs DYNAMIC & CONTENT-FOCUSED Sites 

A static web site consists of seldom changed “pages”; (Home, Contact, Products/Services). Most would update the products/services page seasonally with marketing (phone calls, email campaigns, direct-mail marketing) encouraging people “visit” your site. But once they were there, why would they ever want to come back….until next year when you change it?

A DYNAMIC SITE…

engages the customer. It asks questions, encourages responses and responds to customer desires and trends. Blogging is no longer controlled by the pajama-media. It is an opportunity for a business owner to interact with the end consumer enabling the owner to keep in touch and the prospect to feel important.

Prospects and customers can subscribe to receive update notifications via mobile or email, so they don’t even have to remember to come back or sign-up for an email newsletter or free e-book that also gives the business an opted-in email address. Prospects and customers can Tweet, Share, Like or Send your content to their connections. Commenting or replying to a blog post is the thing to do and presents exposure for the prospect and feedback for the business.

…can be updated by the client, including adding, removing or editing ‘pages’, posting, controlling responses and responding to blog inquiries, initiate discussions or create polls. The client can record videos and post them to the site; introductory videos, sales pitches, training and more. Areas within the site can be publicprivate (not on the menu…only those with the link should find) or password protected (pages with information for a specific group, or for paid subscribers.

…is easily updated and promoted across multiple media. Students and younger parents are more likely to click on a Facebook or Instagram update than to follow an email blog link. There are tools to assist with scheduling and cross-promoting updates to a variety of media frequented by those you are trying to reach.

…gives you valuable dynamic, dated and demographic stats to utilize. A local group facebook page targeting a small group, has about 150 fans, but has reached thousands because content can also show up on fans’ friends’ pages as well. The dynamic stats not only tell me how many people have seen material, but the demographics of who is looking and even which posts or updates attracted them the most.

MANAGED HOSTING / VIRTUALLY ASSISTED. It is getting easier to create and post to media. However, most people running small businesses (been there, done that) are too busy with the day-to-day operations to give adequate attention to promoting what they do. Consider working with someone (LIKE ME) to help you get the word out.

I am AVAILABLE to GUEST POST
I am ACCEPTING Guest Posts

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Posted in Business strategies, Consulting, Income Opportunity, Internet web design and ecommerce, Monetizing, Sales and Marketing, Small Business, Virtual Assistant, Work from Home Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

When you don’t have the time to do it all yourself

Don't try to figure out what all the words on this word wall mean. Let me go to work for you instead.

Don’t try to figure out what all the words on this word wall mean. Let me go to work for you instead.

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